THE WORLD OF ART COLLECTING

BY DEBRA KRONOWITZ

Manolis Projects Studio Gallery

Q: How has working with art collectors changed in the past few years?
A: We are a destination gallery that focuses on two main art categories of collectible art: STEVENMANOLISART plus the Manolis Projects Artist Salon (four painters, two sculptors, two photographers, one cartoonist and five jewelers). The integration of social media and printed material has resulted in a much bigger and focused buying audience.

Q: What do you wish collectors knew that you find yourself repeating to them?
A: The difference between collectible and decorative art.

Q: What trends do you see taking place with collectors?
A: As more art goes online, with prices disclosed, collectors will (and are) becoming more educated. As a result, they will become more selective in their acquisition pursuits.

Q: According to a survey of collectors on Instagram, 51.5 percent have purchased works from artists they discovered through Instagram. Collectors are not only consuming but are also actively engaged. What role does social media have in your business?
A: Social media primarily provides branding awareness and plays a major role in the sales funnel. Social media can also be used to educate our audience on current contemporary art.

Q: Do you think Millennial collectors are shopping online for art or do they want that in-person experience?
A: Our experience is that Millennials will purchase decorative art (artwork priced at less than $2,000) online, but once the value exceeds this number, the buyer wants a direct purchase and ongoing relationship with the artist. They also desire an understanding of the artist’s goals and career path and, therefore, the inherent value of what they are purchasing.

Q: Are young people spending enough money on art?
A: I think many Millennials want to live in a home that is aesthetically attractive and happy. This can be done on an intelligent basis with a very low budget. Spending more money requires a belief that the work is more than consumption and, ultimately, is an investment. Unfortunately, most works purchased at an investible price do not turn out to be collectible art.

Q: What tips or advice do you have for someone starting to collect art?
A: Collect strong art in which there is a communicative message from the artist that resonates with the purchaser. You must connect with what you place on your walls.

Q: How do you think art collecting will change in the near future? What about the art market in general?
A: I think the definition of what is considered art will continue to expand, that Millennials will more likely be more interested in collecting than their parents and will avoid the mistakes and pitfalls that many in the last generation committed. Free information over the internet and widespread dissemination of works allows a cost-free basis for becoming highly knowledgeable. In terms of general trends in art, artists will need to become highly involved in their own branding, marketing, sales and career management than ever before to be successful.


Hot Sands Glass Studio

Q: How has working with art collectors changed in the past few years?
A: I find art collectors are interested in a relationship with the artist and developing custom-designed pieces.

Q: What do you wish collectors knew that you find yourself repeating to them?
A: I design and create especially for them. The initial meeting involves my sketchbook, glass samples and a “conversation on paper.” This is the beginning of their piece.

Q: What trends do you see taking place with collectors?
A: The desire to work with the artist to create a custom piece, reflecting their personality and vision.

Q: According to a survey of collectors on Instagram, 51.5 percent have purchased works from artists they discovered through Instagram. Collectors are not only consuming but are also actively engaged. What role does social media have in your business?
A: We will see!

Q: Do you think Millennial collectors are shopping online for art or do they want that in-person experience?
A: I think they are seeing what is available online. However, to work with the artist one-on-one is a great experience. The creative process is fascinating. Q: Are young people spending enough money on art?

Q: Are young people spending enough money on art?
A: As their taste develops, they will realize the value of original art.

Q: What tips or advice do you have for someone starting to collect art?
A: Make that first phone call. I can design according to the size of your space, your budget and your vision for a total look for your home.

Q: How do you think art collecting will change in the near future? What about the art market in general?
A: I think our collectors are getting more adventurous with their ideas of original art in different mediums for their home and how different mediums interact together.


Joel Shapses Studio

Q: How has working with art collectors changed in the past few years?
A: Collectors work directly or through their interior designers.

Q: What do you wish collectors knew that you find yourself repeating to them?
A: The process and materials used in art.

Q: What trends do you see taking place with collectors?
A: They seem to be searching more online.

Q: According to a survey of collectors on Instagram, 51.5 percent have purchased works from artists they discovered through Instagram. Collectors are not only consuming but are also actively engaged. What role does social media have in your business?
A: I use Facebook and Instagram, and I have a social media manager for social media content.

Q: Do you think Millennial collectors are shopping online for art or do they want that in-person experience?
A: More online, but some still need to see it in person.

Q: Are young people spending enough money on art?
A: I am not really sure.

Q: What tips or advice do you have for someone starting to collect art?
A: Find something that resonates with you.

Q: How do you think art collecting will change in the near future? What about the art market in general?
A: The market is oversaturated and personal contact with artists will play a big role.


Art Scope Gallery

Q: How has working with art collectors changed in the past few years?
A: For many of us art dealers, the major changes come from online and social media. The rise of online art purchases and artist websites, and the popularity of social media have given art collectors easy access to the art.

Q: What do you wish collectors knew that you find yourself repeating to them?
A: Collectors sometimes don’t understand the potential of emerging artists or fear investing in artists who are not well known in the community. I collect paintings from emerging artists and promote their work. I always find it fascinating. I wish collectors would be more open to emerging artists and make the investment.

Q: What trends do you see taking place with collectors?
A: Art is in the eye of the beholder. Line drawing, surrealist and sculptural works have brought some attention to collectors.

Q: According to a survey of collectors on Instagram, 51.5 percent have purchased works from artists they discovered through Instagram. Collectors are not only consuming but are also actively engaged. What role does social media have in your business?
A: Very good point. Social media and my business are working together. I am constantly communicating with collectors and exposing my artwork. Having said that, the role of social media is vital, but a place where people can see it is just as important.

Q: Do you think Millennial collectors are shopping online for art or do they want that in-person experience?
A: They are doing both. The internet enables them to go far away from their home. But the physical place is very important, so they can share their ideas and chat as friends in a more personal way.

Q: Are young people spending enough money on art?
A: Yes, young people are spending enough money on art and attending many events.

Q: What tips or advice do you have for someone starting to collect art?
A: Read magazines, attend events, visit as many art galleries as you can and build a network of friends.

Q: How do you think art collecting will change in the near future? What about the art market in general?
A: Collectors will be spending more time on social media. But the old-fashioned way will never change. People will always read art magazines, always attend art fairs, always exchange ideas in a personal way. That will never change. As people, we need that connection—the interpersonal way, the eye contact.


Claudia Castillo ART

Q: How has working with art collectors changed in the past few years?
A: I have found that significant changes in the art industry have impacted the relationship with collectors. The fact that there is more of everything: more people, more venues, more publications, more artists, and the availability of more art and social media platforms have opened the window of opportunity for collectors and artists. The last years have marked the rise and proliferation of curators, collectors and architects specializing in bringing more art to the forefront, including corporate brands, and providing mass entertainment to generate tourism and for social benefits. Art has moved from margin to center, and with that, the role of the traditional collector has changed, giving way for others to enter that market at various scales to make an impact as an investment and commodity.

Q: What do you wish collectors knew that you find yourself repeating to them?
A: Everything is not about the money. An investment takes time to grow. Research the artist. However, give emerging artists an opportunity. Always aim to diversify your portfolio of work by acquiring from emerging, already established and well-known sources.

Q: What trends do you see taking place with collectors?
A: Political and world events are causing a hesitation in spending on nonessentials, such as art. Mid-market art pieces are selling better than higher-priced artwork. The online markets are having a tremendous impact on traditional auction houses. Newer, more nimble and smaller platforms, including online selling venues, are capturing young collectors and facilitate finding excellent investment pieces at a reasonable price. Overall, it is a great time to collect art from national and international artists, and in mediums such as photography and mixed media.

Q: According to a survey of collectors on Instagram, 51.5 percent have purchased works from artists they discovered through Instagram. Collectors are not only consuming but are also actively engaged. What role does social media have in your business?
A: Millennials utilize social media to engage and start a conversation, adding the artist and gallerist on Facebook and Instagram as a point of commencement before they purchase artwork. We find that artists also use the social media platform to connect to a wider audience and have more ranges of opportunity to sell their artwork beyond the traditional gallery or auction house. The speed of social media forces artists to be on top of their game and provides more opportunities for collectors to see ranges of work from a greater pool. Millennials are socially savvy and take advantage of options available to research and acquire art.

Q: Do you think Millennial collectors are shopping online for art or do they want that in-person experience?
A: I believe art is a personal connection and though some may purchase online, most of our buyers like to see the piece, experience what it means to them, and they love to meet the artist in person. Millennials, as well as other buyers, tell us they prefer to make that personal connection, though they do use social media to do their research first.

Q: Are young people spending enough money on art?
A:Most people today—young and more seasoned—are not spending excessively on art. They tend to spend what they can within their means. We find that people appreciate the value of art; however, the economy limits their ability to dedicate more of their earnings to art and culture. Many buyers we see plan for their purchases and take time to think about acquiring art, especially if it is more expensive.

Q: What tips or advice do you have for someone starting to collect art?
A: I recommend they start with their local community and look for emerging artists who are on the rise. Monthly local art shows provide great opportunities for collectors to see a variety of emerging and often well-known artists in one location. This affords an ability to purchase artwork at a good value for anyone beginning or expanding their collections.

Q: How do you think art collecting will change in the near future? What about the art market in general?
A: We see more artists opening their own galleries and becoming collectors and facilitators for art because as they gain more business knowledge, they can better represent other artists because they have similar experiences. The connectivity of social media has blurred the international lines and facilitated the acquisition of worldwide art by everyone.


Hidden Bay Studio/Beau Wild

Q: How has working with art collectors changed in the past few years?
A: Brick-and-mortar galleries remain a steady avenue to purchase my work, but collectors and interior designers are now actively viewing and purchasing my work on social media and by visiting my studio.

Q: What do you wish collectors knew that you find yourself repeating to them?
A: I want them to know my process, that I paint every day. I staple canvas or paper to my wall, which allows me to work large, backing away from the painting to scrutinize the forms within the painting. I paint intuitively, without any idea or reference, adding marks, globs of paint, lines created by a long stick, large and small shapes with textures, as the painting emerges. I continue to develop the painting until there is nothing more I want to add or remove. It is a process of discovery.

Q: What trends do you see taking place with collectors?
A: Trends vary from time to time. Abstract art, whether nonobjective or figurative, continues to grow in importance in the art world.

Q: According to a survey of collectors on Instagram, 51.5 percent have purchased works from artists they discovered through Instagram. Collectors are not only consuming but are also actively engaged. What role does social media have in your business?
A: Instagram and Facebook have both increased my marketing venues and sales.

Q: Do you think Millennial collectors are shopping online for art or do they want that in-person experience?
A: Millennial collectors seem to want both: shopping online and to come to my studio for that in-person experience.

Q: Are young people spending enough money on art?
A: Young people are purchasing art, but is it enough? That is hard to say. Their money must first pay for the necessities for a growing family.

Q: What tips or advice do you have for someone starting to collect art?
A: My advice to new collectors is to find art that excites you, that informs you and gives you some insight into yourself or the world around you.

Q: How do you think art collecting will change in the near future? What about the art market in general?
A: The art market continues to evolve just as the internet has transformed so many other aspects in our society. And with the internet, more people are becoming more educated in art.


Christopher Martin Gallery

Q: How has working with art collectors changed in the past few years?
A: The relationship is more direct and immediate. They choose the pieces that best fit with the vein of their collection and many times they commission site-specific works. Collectors are highly interested in meeting the artist and making valuable connections.

Q: What do you wish collectors knew that you find yourself repeating to them?
A: Art is more than investment, and through their patronage they contribute to furthering new artists’ careers.

Q: What trends do you see taking place with collectors?
A: I see a diminished attention to art fairs, and collectors developing relations with the brick-and-mortar galleries that have gained their trust.

Q: According to a survey of collectors on Instagram, 51.5 percent have purchased works from artists they discovered through Instagram. Collectors are not only consuming but are also actively engaged. What role does social media have in your business?
A: Social media is very visual. For us, it is a symbiotic relationship: Our community gets to know more about our activities, programs and pieces in private collections. We also get to know our collectors better, their social engagement and connect though common causes.

Q: Do you think Millennial collectors are shopping online for art or do they want that in-person experience?
A: A mix of both. Millennial collectors like to discover new experiences by themselves and appreciate freshness and being included with a backstage pass of sorts. But after the first level of knowingness though social postings, they seem to crave a deeper interaction with those that capture their attention.

Q: Are young people spending enough money on art?
A: Never enough! Buying original art secures that a new generation of creative people have the ability to make a living doing what they love and not working several jobs that distract them from their creative pursuit.

Q: What tips or advice do you have for someone starting to collect art?
A: Go for what you like, what moves you deeply.

Q: How do you think art collecting will change in the near future? What about the art market in general?
A: Art appreciation and education are key to forge generations that support the arts and art collecting. As more mediums are explored by daring artists, a more robust ecology of art will have the opportunity to cement itself. It also requires museums giving opportunities to—and highlighting the work of—contemporary living artists. The art market follows art awareness. We make the art market of tomorrow through our collective actions today.


Guess-Fisher Gallery

Q: How has working with art collectors changed in the past few years?
A: The art world is constantly transitioning with more interest stimulated online, but our collectors want to stop in and visit with us, the artists, and see some of our new works. Our gallery has a creative and inviting environment that is worth the trip.

Q: What do you wish collectors knew that you find yourself repeating to them?
A: Art increases in value, and it doesn’t go on sale because it’s an investment. We encourage them to take paintings home “on approval” to see how it feels in their environment before deciding to buy.

Q: What trends do you see taking place with collectors?
A: They will go to various online sites to sample the look and feel of our works and then come in person to view the newest pieces of art they may be considering. There is no substitute for seeing a piece of art in person, in your own home and light, to close the purchase.

Q: According to a survey of collectors on Instagram, 51.5 percent have purchased works from artists they discovered through Instagram. Collectors are not only consuming but are also actively engaged. What role does social media have in your business?
A: We have a presence on Instagram and Facebook, showing information about events and images of new works available.

Q: Do you think Millennial collectors are shopping online for art or do they want that in-person experience?
A: Online, mostly. There are a few who want that in-person experience, but that doesn’t seem to be their comfort zone. We focus on the buyer looking for that unique in-person experience that we offer.

Q: Are young people spending enough money on art?
A: Influences around them help shape such decisions. It starts with creating an environment to live in that supports a personal comfort zone. Education is needed to help encourage the necessity of art purchasing as part of a living budget.

Q: What tips or advice do you have for someone starting to collect art?
A:Buy what you like and like what you buy. An original piece of art is one thing in life that you can say you are the only one who has it. Our world offers so much of the same. It’s nice to own something unique. Our gallery offers various levels of options to invest in art, images that satisfy any budget of collecting. Sometimes, to get a higher level of investment, it’s important to offer nice works that fall into a lower level of expense, so people can experience the joy of art ownership. It’s one way to educate the prospective collector.

Q: How do you think art collecting will change in the near future? What about the art market in general?
A: As contemporary artists, I believe the market will be similar to the past 35 years. It will have its ups and downs, but having art is important in our lives for a full life. Hopefully, education will improve and help support the need for art in our lives.


H-AllenArt.com, Inc. Fine Art Photography

Q: How has working with art collectors changed in the past few years?
A: They have become a bit more conservative and lean more toward contemporary art.

Q: What do you wish collectors knew that you find yourself repeating to them?
A: My affinity for cultural fine art photography and the trademark of my work, which is depth and texture. “Depth” with a goal of drawing one’s eye into the picture and “texture,” which gives me a visceral pleasure, highlighting varying objects’ multifaceted shapes and shades of light.

Q: What trends do you see taking place with collectors?
A: Buying based more on passion for the art over resale value.

Q: According to a survey of collectors on Instagram, 51.5 percent have purchased works from artists they discovered through Instagram. Collectors are not only consuming but are also actively engaged. What role does social media have in your business?
A: More than increasing sales, it has been the national and global recognition for my work, which I find extremely gratifying.

Q: Do you think Millennial collectors are shopping online for art or do they want that in-person experience?
A: In person, as indicated by recent sales.

Q: Are young people spending enough money on art?
A: Not until recently. I am finding the trend increasing.

Q: What tips or advice do you have for someone starting to collect art?
A: Follow their passion for the moment. However, if not sure, they should sleep on their intent to purchase and, if they wake up the next morning still thinking about the art piece, they will have their answer.

Q: How do you think art collecting will change in the near future? What about the art market in general?
A: Since 2008, I have seen a more conservative approach to buying art. However, recently, Millennials’ interest in art seems to indicate more activity in this area.


Kevin McPherrin Gallery

Q: How has working with art collectors changed in the past few years?
A: Clients are more interested in new artists as opposed to established names—especially street artists.

Q: What do you wish collectors knew that you find yourself repeating to them?
A: That if they invest in a giclée, an unlimited number of other people will have the exact same painting on their walls.

Q: What trends do you see taking place with collectors?
A: The same as in answer two, plus contemporary is king!

Q: According to a survey of collectors on Instagram, 51.5 percent have purchased works from artists they discovered through Instagram. Collectors are not only consuming but are also actively engaged. What role does social media have in your business?
A: It’s growing!

Q: Do you think Millennial collectors are shopping online for art or do they want that in-person experience?
A: Both. For less expensive items, online works. Larger investments require “kicking the tires.”

Q: Are young people spending enough money on art?
A: Never enough! Many are seduced by bling, not quality.

Q: What tips or advice do you have for someone starting to collect art?
A: Buy what you love. “Hotness” only matters if you’re feeling the heat yourself!

Q: How do you think art collecting will change in the near future? What about the art market in general?
A: Authentically “one-of-a-kind” pieces will become increasingly desirable. The art market on all levels shows no sign of contraction.


Jane Johnson

Q: How has working with art collectors changed in the past few years?
A: I am experiencing more younger buyers.

Q: What do you wish collectors knew that you find yourself repeating to them?
A: Buy what you love.

Q: What trends do you see taking place with collectors?
A: They are more in touch with social media.

Q: According to a survey of collectors on Instagram, 51.5 percent have purchased works from artists they discovered through Instagram. Collectors are not only consuming but are also actively engaged. What role does social media have in your business?
A: I need to create more of a presence on social media. My problem is, I only want to paint.

Q: Do you think Millennial collectors are shopping online for art or do they want that in-person experience?
A: I believe once they see the art in person, they follow up with online buying.

Q: Are young people spending enough money on art?
A: We will see. If a significant person in their lives valued art, then following generations tend to also see value in collecting art.

Q: What tips or advice do you have for someone starting to collect art?
A: Buy originals when you can.

Q: How do you think art collecting will change in the near future? What about the art market in general?
A: I believe with social media, more artists are able to sell their work to a greater audience. There will always be a market for art; people need art to uplift their spirits and remind themselves of the beauty surrounding them. Art inspires us to know ourselves.


Pat Anderson Artist

Q: How has working with art collectors changed in the past few years?
A: The Millennial art collectors are discovering fresh, new art to relate to their high-rise lifestyles. Art is recreational. Strolling the galleries is the new meeting place.

Q: What do you wish collectors knew that you find yourself repeating to them?
A: When a collector loves an artist’s work, they buy more over the years.

Q: What trends do you see taking place with collectors?
A: Collectors still like to buy what they like.

Q: According to a survey of collectors on Instagram, 51.5 percent have purchased works from artists they discovered through Instagram. Collectors are not only consuming but are also actively engaged. What role does social media have in your business?
A: My students do their own Instagram and social media, and say they sell a couple works per month.

Q: Do you think Millennial collectors are shopping online for art or do they want that in-person experience?
A: My collectors are all ages. Many seniors don’t do Instagram. They ask my advice for their collections. The Millennials show me their desire to have a painting and want to paint it themselves. To learn how to paint oils, acrylics, watercolor is very important and that is the buzz with the young executives. To talk art as an artist is the new personality of the Millennials. To identify technique and talk the art language is impressive now.

Q: What tips or advice do you have for someone starting to collect art?
A: If you like it, buy it or give as a gift. Art lasts a lifetime, whether you enjoy it or some else enjoys it.

Q: How do you think art collecting will change in the near future? What about the art market in general?
A: I believe artwork of places visited will always be treasures and heirlooms, realistic or contemporary. Art is a language. A gift of art is a gift of love.


delrayART

Q: How has working with art collectors changed in the past few years?
A:The art world as it was known prior to the advent of the big shows and social media is in flux, and this has created all sorts of opportunities for people who might not have considered themselves to be in the collector space in the old “white box” gallery days. I am seeing a lot of young people who are not wealthy buying works in the $3,000 to $5,000 range.

Q: What do you wish collectors knew that you find yourself repeating to them?
A: I take each person on their own terms. Some know exactly what they want while others are open to new things. I don’t really try and sell my work from an investment standpoint. I just figure, if they love the piece and they feel it’s worth it, they will purchase. I suppose some who didn’t particularly like my work or care one way or another but imagined it might appreciate have bought my work from other galleries.

Q: What trends do you see taking place with collectors?
A: As people get more comfortable with Instagram and other social media platforms, price pressures are coming to bear simply because there is so much work flooding into everyone’s phone. Of course, an awful lot is junk, but savvy users quickly filter that out, which still leaves an ocean of exciting work in virtually every genre. What are they actually buying and for how much? If you are not following the secondary market, it can be bewildering, but it’s sorting itself out. Just buy at the intersection of what you can afford and love and you can’t lose.

Q: According to a survey of collectors on Instagram, 51.5 percent have purchased works from artists they discovered through Instagram. Collectors are not only consuming but are also actively engaged. What role does social media have in your business?
A: We are putting more and more resources into Instagram and seeking ways to turn it into a selling platform. Instagram is great for flash sales of prints, but when you are in a higher price point, this is a challenge, since most people really want to see and feel the work before they buy.

Q: Do you think Millennial collectors are shopping online for art or do they want that in-person experience?
A: Yes.

Q: Are young people spending enough money on art?
A: It’s hard to say. Who knows if wall art will be a thing in 20 years? But for now, I meet a fair number of young couples who want to buy “real art” and have the resources to do so.

Q: What tips or advice do you have for someone starting to collect art?
A: My experience is that those who collect what they love are seldom disappointed at the end of the day, either emotionally or financially.

Q: How do you think art collecting will change in the near future? What about the art market in general?
A: This is a great question and I really don’t know. But, I do believe as we figure out how to filter and select from the never-ending digital image stream flowing into our devices, hierarchies of value will form spontaneously, as opposed to being created by small numbers of critics and collectors. One level will be more democratic and cut against the alienating elitism that used to typify the collecting world.


Kirsten Hines

Q: How has working with art collectors changed in the past few years?
A: As a photographer, one of the most exciting changes over the past few years has been the increasing acceptance of, and interest in, photography as a fine art form.

Q: What do you wish collectors knew that you find yourself repeating to them?
A: Given all the technological advancements in digital imaging, there’s a widespread assumption (and expectation) that photographs and photo-based artwork are all digitally enhanced and manipulated. I’m constantly being asked whether elements in my images have been “Photoshopped in,” but this is in fact counter to my own philosophy. I subscribe to the notion that nature is magical in its unaltered state, and I strive to capture that magic in my camera as I experience it in the moment. Even my abstract work relies on unique perspectives and in-camera photographic techniques that I engage in the moment. I see my art as reflecting nature, not re-creating it.

Q: What trends do you see taking place with collectors?
A: I’ve noticed a shift from collecting art for investment purposes to one inspired by an interest in the work itself, the process of creating that work, and the artist as an individual. I believe this has led to more diverse collecting of artists at various points in their careers, as well as a wider range of media and display locations, including in private offices, hotels, restaurants and in a range of public venues, further encouraged through civic public art programs.

Q: According to a survey of collectors on Instagram, 51.5 percent have purchased works from artists they discovered through Instagram. Collectors are not only consuming but are also actively engaged. What role does social media have in your business?
A: I find social media plays an important role both in reaching new audiences and in continuing engagements with people already familiar with my work, especially in letting them know where they might be able to connect with me in person at various shows, openings and other events.

Q: Do you think Millennial collectors are shopping online for art or do they want that in-person experience?
A: It’s a bit of both. Millennials don’t mind shopping online, but just like most people, they appreciate authenticity and personal connections. They’re more likely to make an online art purchase from an artist they’ve already met in person, or at least from someone they’ve been following on social media long enough to feel they know.

Q: What tips or advice do you have for someone starting to collect art?
A: I think it’s important that new collectors follow their instincts and buy what they love, pieces that are not just aesthetically appealing to them but also make them happy.

Q: How do you think art collecting will change in the near future? What about the art market in general?
A: There will always be a market for pieces by artists with name recognition (both historical and contemporary), but I think the wider accessibility of art from around the world has opened the playing field for artists at all stages of their careers and in a wider range of media, such as photography, which historically wasn’t as popular among art collectors.


Klara Chavarria Contemporary Art

Q: How has working with art collectors changed in the past few years?
A: Our collector base is diverse: local, national and international collectors in a range of ages. We have had, and continue to work with, all who are interested—new, mid and experienced private and corporate collectors, as well as with some special and public projects.

Q: What do you wish collectors knew that you find yourself repeating to them?
A: They need to find and collect pieces they love and that means something to them, to get to know the body of work of the artist and the meaning behind each work—enjoy the process of it.

Q: What trends do you see taking place with collectors?
A: In our experience, our collectors want pieces that move them, and they are interested in quality, authentic work.

Q: According to a survey of collectors on Instagram, 51.5 percent have purchased works from artists they discovered through Instagram. Collectors are not only consuming but are also actively engaged. What role does social media have in your business?
A: We are active and always growing the use of social media to interact and inform our clients and collectors. Now that technology is part of our lives, it’s very important for all businesses, including art.

Q: Do you think Millennial collectors are shopping online for art or do they want that in-person experience?
A: Both. More online, some in person.

Q: Are young people spending enough money on art?
A: Yes, but in selected groups—mostly people who already have interest, appreciation and some knowledge regarding culture and art. For others it may take longer to learn and appreciate and to start collecting.

Q: What tips or advice do you have for someone starting to collect art?
A: Take the time to research and learn from each artist, ask questions, attend openings, visit the studios/galleries and acquire art that’s meaningful and that you love. There is always flexibility and a range of prices to start collecting.

Q: How do you think art collecting will change in the near future? What about the art market in general?
A: We hope it will be more accessible and available to all, and include more education and sharing the importance of art in our society and our daily lives.


Aldo Castillo Gallery

Q: How has working with art collectors changed in the past few years?
A:They are from all over the world. The internet has made it easier for the gallery to have a worldwide audience.

Q: What do you wish collectors knew that you find yourself repeating to them?
A: That the art we offer has a combination of three major elements: the talent of our artists, their internationality and the artworks’ strong, global social messages.

Q: What trends do you see taking place with collectors?
A: Most of our collectors are now collecting contemporary art.

Q: According to a survey of collectors on Instagram, 51.5 percent have purchased works from artists they discovered through Instagram. Collectors are not only consuming but are also actively engaged. What role does social media have in your business?
A: It is, simply, the new way.

Q: Do you think Millennial collectors are shopping online for art or do they want that in-person experience?
A: I believe they are shopping online.

Q: Are young people spending enough money on art?
A:Only from countries where the economy is great.

Q: What tips or advice do you have for someone starting to collect art?
A: There’s a big difference between buying art and collecting art. Buying art is more of a random activity, while collecting art is more of a purposeful, directed, long-term commitment.

Q: How do you think art collecting will change in the near future? What about the art market in general?
A: The average age of collectors will be younger, predominantly driven by Asia due to its prosperous economy. Electronic information has a massive influence over collectors worldwide.


Architectural Wall Décor Art Gallery

Q: How has working with art collectors changed in the past few years?
A: Art collectors have more available outlets and resources to see and purchase art. Locating fine art is now more easily available; prices are not so confidentially sourced.

Q: What do you wish collectors knew that you find yourself repeating to them?
A: That The market to collect art is more available to collectors who wish to enter the market.

Q: What trends do you see taking place with collectors?
A: That The famous and historic pieces are still the most soughtafter items. However, contemporary art has gained momentum and popularity among a new group of younger, affluent collectors. As well, foreign investors are more prevalent in the market than ever before. The United States represents a growth in collectors with disposable funds to invest in art.

Q: According to a survey of collectors on Instagram, 51.5 percent have purchased works from artists they discovered through Instagram. Collectors are not only consuming but are also actively engaged. What role does social media have in your business?
A: My gallery is new. However, my work is not new to the market. We are actively involved in working with social media to become connected to various platforms.

Q: Do you think Millennial collectors are shopping online for art or do they want that in-person experience?
A: Because Millennials are social media savvy, they are more easily connected to artists and sources. Their taste has become more contemporary and there is more of this type of art available to collectors. Young collectors are more willing to visit nontraditional sources to discover different artists and art.

Q: Are young people spending enough money on art?
A: Yes, since collecting art has expanded to a much wider market, which includes more local artists.

Q: What tips or advice do you have for someone starting to collect art?
A: Collecting should be more about art that makes sense, that makes the collector happy, than art that may be worth more money someday.

Q: How do you think art collecting will change in the near future? What about the art market in general?
A: Contemporary art will make an impact on the market now and in the future.


Emily James Art Gallery

Q: How has working with art collectors changed in the past few years?
A: Collectors now seem to enjoy a more meaningful connection to their selection. Since my gallery features only my work, we both enjoy the personal relationship, and collectors relate how they enjoy getting to know the artist who created the artwork.

Q: What do you wish collectors knew that you find yourself repeating to them?
A: That it’s fine to request and enjoy specific colors in the artwork. Different colors appeal to different people, whether accenting furnishings or simply enjoying a favorite color that brings you happiness when viewed.

Q: What trends do you see taking place with collectors?
A: They seem more focused on certain sized pieces to enhance an area. They come to the gallery with measurements, which is quite helpful.

Q: According to a survey of collectors on Instagram, 51.5 percent have purchased works from artists they discovered through Instagram. Collectors are not only consuming but are also actively engaged. What role does social media have in your business?
A: We are stepping up our social media programs, although a website has always been a large advantage in showing our inventory. It can be time-consuming, and I have a person on staff who is wonderful about keeping active notifications and updates.

Q: Do you think Millennial collectors are shopping online for art or do they want that in-person experience?
A: They see the work online, but they follow up with a call and visit.

Q: Are young people spending enough money on art?
A:There will always be numerous venues for young people to enjoy artwork, and as their tastes develop, they move to a higher quality of work.

Q: What tips or advice do you have for someone starting to collect art?
A: View everything you can but rely on your heart to make the final selection. When you love something, it brings long-lasting enjoyment.

Q: How do you think art collecting will change in the near future? What about the art market in general?
A: I feel art will always be cherished and enjoyed as it has been for thousands of years. Period.


Doug Powell Art

Q: How has working with art collectors changed in the past few years?
A: My unusual art medium of creating art with up-cycled computer keys caught the interest of Ripley’s “Believe It Or Not!” in October of 2010. The major shift in collectors came in December 2017, when I stepped up to the plate to participate in Art Basel Miami. This was a very successful event for me, having top sales at Spectrum Miami and being named in the show’s Directors’ Pick. My first large sale went to the award-winning Guarisco Gallery in Washington, D.C. Much of the sales and commissions draw from the gallery’s seasoned client base. Strong sales have also occurred from annual art fairs, and jewelry, art and antiques shows.

Q: What do you wish collectors knew that you find yourself repeating to them?
A: Collectors always have questions about my art and the unusual medium of computer keys. They are always caught by surprise when approaching the art, not knowing what the medium is, and they always love to hear the backstory of how and where I collect my up-cycled medium. For the patrons, it’s a fascinating discovery because they’ve never seen anything like it. I’m currently the only mosaic artist working with computer keys on this scale in portraiture.

Q: What trends do you see taking place with collectors?
A: Since my Art Basel experience in Miami 2017, I see sculpture and heavily textured art being very popular. Large sculpture and large statement pieces seem to find a place in homes and businesses in the past three years. The theme of up-cycled art is very appealing and trending. Avant-garde, ironically, is almost classic in the sense that patrons are hitting the refresh button with Salvador Dali, Georgia O’Keeffe, Jackson Pollock, Chuck Close, Andy Warhol and many others.

Q: According to a survey of collectors on Instagram, 51.5 percent have purchased works from artists they discovered through Instagram. Collectors are not only consuming but are also actively engaged. What role does social media have in your business?
A: Because of the internet and social media, artists have been able to successfully be and remain their own agent. The world is now the artists’ market.

Q: Do you think Millennial collectors are shopping online for art or do they want that in-person experience?
A: Millennial collectors do both. At some point soon, though, I think we are going to go full circle with the online cyberspace experience. The internet is the lead-in, but getting the cultural experience of the art world can’t be missed by any Millennial. That remains where the rubber meets the road.

Q: Are young people spending enough money on art?
A: Young people in college or the under 30 demographics are probably not spending on big-money art yet, but rather prints and smaller, local art. I think that’s a great segue into significant pieces later. Supporting local artists is vital, for they, too, are hopeful to emerge into the next great chapter of their art endeavors. I believe the heaviest concentration of emerging art is coming from artists who are retired or on their third or fourth career and don’t want any part of being addicted to the internet.

Q: What tips or advice do you have for someone starting to collect art?
A: Buy original art first and foremost because you love it, not necessarily for the investment.

Q: How do you think art collecting will change in the near future? What about the art market in general?
A: I think the demand for art is here to stay. Like music, it is and always will be woven into the fabric of our individual experience with this world.


Gallery Vibe

Q: How has working with art collectors changed in the past few years?
A: Collectors in recent years are far more conscious of acquiring art that will accentuate the architecture and design of their home. From an art historical viewpoint, this phenomenon has existed for many centuries. After all, even Michelangelo had the design of the Vatican in mind when creating his masterpieces.

Q: What do you wish collectors knew that you find yourself repeating to them?
A: The best way to make a decision on a painting is to follow one’s heart, rather than scrutinizing the work’s correlation with one’s overall décor.

Q: According to a survey of collectors on Instagram, 51.5 percent have purchased works from artists they discovered through Instagram. Collectors are not only consuming but are also actively engaged. What role does social media have in your business?
A: Instagram has proven to be very beneficial for us. We not only can keep our followers acquainted with the gallery, but now our collectors can be more actively involved in the world of the artists they collect. They often reach out to our artists and share photos of their work hanging in their home, plus they really enjoy the daily glimpses into studio life.

Q: Do you think Millennial collectors are shopping online for art or do they want that in-person experience?
A: In our experience, most collectors want to view works of art in person prior to making a commitment. However, we do sell many works to collectors out of our area via our website—especially if the collector is already familiar with the artist’s work.

Q: Are young people spending enough money on art?
A: We’re not sure, as the majority of our area’s population would not be considered “young.” They are, however, very young at heart!

Q: What tips or advice do you have for someone starting to collect art?
A: First and foremost, always follow your heart. Art that stirs your soul is something you’ll enjoy for the rest of your life! Also, be open to diversifying your collection to include a variety of genres, such as abstract, landscape, figurative and still life. Lastly, be receptive to including a variety of mediums, such as paintings on canvas, pastels, watercolors, photography, mixed media, glass, ceramics or sculpture.

Q: How do you think art collecting will change in the near future? What about the art market in general?
A: The key to our gallery’s success has been to continually adapt to our regional marketplace, rather than relying solely on nationwide trends.


Marlene Rose Gallery

Q: How has working with art collectors changed in the past few years?
A: A decade ago, galleries ruled. They would develop artist’s careers, cultivate clients and act as the gatekeepers between artist and audience. Art Basel in its many incarnations and with its followers, and the advent of the internet, shook this model. Collectors now have unrestricted access to information. But on this ocean of data collectors sail without a compass to guide them. So, the gallerist has even more responsibility and opportunity to guide the collector, knowing the collector now has access to these apparently boundless horizons of information.

Q: What do you wish collectors knew that you find yourself repeating to them?
A: I never tire of educating my collectors in the unusual technique (sand-cast glass) I use and the origins of my inspiration.

Q: What trends do you see taking place with collectors?
A: They know more what they like, as they have been exposed to so much. Some tend to shop around. That means that when they get to you, they know what they want. I welcome an educated collector, especially a self-educated one!

Q: According to a survey of collectors on Instagram, 51.5 percent have purchased works from artists they discovered through Instagram. Collectors are not only consuming but are also actively engaged. What role does social media have in your business?
A: For me, social media plays a smaller role than direct contact with collectors. Having said that, I have a large social media presence. It is there to show more of what I make and to excite collectors than to be the primary point of sale.

Q: Do you think Millennial collectors are shopping online for art or do they want that in-person experience?
A: They may research online, and are very savvy at that, but nothing beats meeting the artist in person. Online work tends mostly to be at a lower price point. Once they are buying more expensive items, they want to see and touch and feel it in person.

Q: Are young people spending enough money on art?
A: No. Not yet. The pressures of modern life seem to have delayed this phase of adulthood. However, I am reminded of the advice of the ancient Chinese sage: “If you have but one coin left, and must choose between bread and a chrysanthemum, always buy the chrysanthemum.” Art is forever and feeds the soul. A body is fleeting. You will always figure out the eating bit.

Q: What tips or advice do you have for someone starting to collect art?
A: Find what moves you. Tell the artist what it does for you. Figure out a way to pay for it, even over time. Artists love to have their work acknowledged and will work with you to let you have the work. Do not bargain too hard with the artist. He must eat, too. And the more you push the price down, the less value the work has to you.

Q: How do you think art collecting will change in the near future? What about the art market in general?
A: New outlets for art will emerge. The model of gallery-only was challenged by a plethora of art fairs and then the internet. Who knows what is next. All I know is that an artistic communication is sacred and eternal. And no matter what, the human spirit will find a way to express itself in aesthetics, and people need to feed their souls.


Talin Atelier

Q: How has working with art collectors changed in the past few years?
A:For me, most of my paintings have been custom commissions, and 80 percent of my commissions come through designers. People still want something beautiful in their environment, and they like having the option to acquire exactly what they want and not have to compromise only to buy something ready-made.

Q: What do you wish collectors knew that you find yourself repeating to them?
A:This isn’t an issue in my case, as I work closely with the client to achieve the outcome they wish to have.

Q: What trends do you see taking place with collectors?
A: There appears to be a trend among some of buying what is popular without researching on one’s own. But I have also seen a trend where people do their due diligence and search out quality, longevity and value in the art they purchase.

Q: According to a survey of collectors on Instagram, 51.5 percent have purchased works from artists they discovered through Instagram. Collectors are not only consuming but are also actively engaged. What role does social media have in your business?
A: Social media is where I am found or noticed. This leads to a phone call, email or in-person initial contact.

Q: Do you think Millennial collectors are shopping online for art or do they want that in-person experience?
A: It depends on the price point and budget. If it is a major purchase, the individual collector wants to meet the artist. He/she wants to see who is creating the artwork or who has created their piece. It is important to the collector to know details and nuances about the piece they have purchased or will purchase. On the reverse, there is the collector who is mainly interested in having something nice to decorate their space. These collectors don’t wish to spend as much and don’t feel it is as important to meet the artist.

Q: Are young people spending enough money on art?
A:I believe they are spending money on art. However, the amount is dependent on their goal.

Q: What tips or advice do you have for someone starting to collect art?
A: Read, research, decide on the styles, genre and mediums of art you find most appealing and what you seem to be drawn to. Then, find a reputable art consultant with experience in the business and have a consultation. Their guidance and knowledge will be invaluable to a new collector.

Q: How do you think art collecting will change in the near future? What about the art market in general?
A: I see art consultants continuing to give advice via the internet, have meetings with the artists via the internet and attend auctions online. This is already happening, but it will continue on a more frequent and larger scale, as collectors may not have the time or wish to go on location or travel. As for the art market in general, with all the trends and fads put aside, I am still a believer that people, in general, want a thing of beauty, quality, skill, expertise and uniqueness. I believe collectors of all financial standings will continue to purchase works of art in the academic arena, as well as in the decorative arena.


Sweet Art Gallery

Q: How has working with art collectors changed in the past few years?
A:Today’s interiors are shifting toward neutral palettes; the design is sleek, modern and streamlined. Collectors are seeking original art that is the signature piece of the room—large, vibrant abstracts.

Q: What do you wish collectors knew that you find yourself repeating to them?
A: The art you choose does not need to be limited to the colors of your décor or the color of your walls.

Q: What trends do you see taking place with collectors?
A: Real collectors purchase real art, period. Collectors are not decorators, they buy what they love and find a place for it. They are interested in the background of the artists they collect. As gallerists, we strive to help them build collections of value. We have seen a return of mid-century modern and contemporary interiors. Many of our artists were up-and-coming in the late 1950s, having shown in museums back then. It is just recently that we all “de-Tuscanized,” in favor of more color along with less landscapes and street scenes. Contemporary and abstract original artwork is back, bigger than ever.

Q: According to a survey of collectors on Instagram, 51.5 percent have purchased works from artists they discovered through Instagram. Collectors are not only consuming but are also actively engaged. What role does social media have in your business?
A: Today’s collectors are savvier. They do their research on artists and galleries. The use of social media allows us to reach a global audience and reach out to our clients with the press of a button. Our gallery’s extensive website lets prospective buyers browse our inventory 24/7. When a client is interested, they usually want to see it in person before purchasing, unless they have purchased with us before.

Q: Do you think Millennial collectors are shopping online for art or do they want that in-person experience?
A: Millenials do everything online. Posting art events on Facebook, Instagram and Snapchat gets Millennials out to support young, upcoming artists. Marcus Jansen, one of America’s great younger artists of today, has a huge following on social media.

Q: Are young people spending enough money on art?
A:Millenials are influenced by large amounts of fastpaced, online media. They crave that stimulation in the art they buy as well. We find that they make up their minds much faster than older generations once they are captured by a piece or artist. Usually, it is a focus piece. They are willing to spend on one piece of impact rather than several pieces.

Q: What tips or advice do you have for someone starting to collect art?
A: When starting to collect, our solid advice is to buy art that speaks to you. Ask questions. Artists love to talk about their work, and gallerists can help you validate the piece. Most galleries let you take artwork home for a day or two to make sure you are making the right decision. Lastly, buy it because you love it, not because it matches your couch.

Q: How do you think art collecting will change in the near future? What about the art market in general?
A: Buying less is more in the long run of art investing. We are already seeing a change of living without so much “stuff.” Art has always been a great means of investing and will continue to be such.


Souren Mousavi Fine ART (ZM)

Q: How has working with art collectors changed in the past few years?
A:The decline of storefront galleries has created a shift in the marketplace concurrent with the expansion of social media. Most professional artists now have an electronic window to the world, and collectors will often bypass intermediaries, especially when looking for new opportunities. In my case, I created my own digital gallery and, since working in the United States, have predominantly dealt with collectors on a direct basis. Frequently, this has meant inviting them directly into my studio and showing both completed works and works in progress. The studio must reflect both the artist’s character and professionalism. Alternatively, you must ensure that works are made available for personal viewings, preferably on a global basis. This has often meant using exhibition networks rather than static gallery locations. Obviously, the more established artists still utilize some of the better-known static galleries, but in many cases, artists now need to have professional business skills of their own or need to be supported by a professional manager. For most artists, the combination of creative genius and business acumen is an unusual mix, but one that has become essential.

Q: What do you wish collectors knew that you find yourself repeating to them?
A: In some instances, new collectors still forget that an artist needs to ensure their own professional longevity and that their direct pricing is based on a mix of market value and production overhead. The absence of a third party taking a commission has already been considered, but collectors often think they can reduce the price based on this formula. Some of my own pieces require several weeks of intense effort to produce the end artwork. Even if they love the result, many new collectors have no insight about the time involved. It can be disheartening to be offered the hourly rate of a cleaner for something that bares your soul and offers a lifetime of pleasure to the buyer. In my case, sadly, there is still a lack of understanding of my own heritage. Because I come from the Middle East, I still tend to be stereotyped. I was persecuted in Iran because of my belief in freedom of expression and equality for all. I have always wanted to love the American dream.

Q: What trends do you see taking place with collectors?
A: In my experience, many collectors want an ongoing relationship with their preferred artists. They want to be kept up to date with works in progress, developments in their career, awards, commendations, exhibitions, etc. In most cases, the collector likes to talk knowledgably not only about the pieces they have acquired from you, but also about you as an individual. Many artists rely on information provided at the point of sale, but an ongoing dialogue is essential to both retaining interest and reinforcing the collector’s understanding of the artists themselves. Collectors are now using social media more and more, both to augment their collection and to broaden their market window.

Q: According to a survey of collectors on Instagram, 51.5 percent have purchased works from artists they discovered through Instagram. Collectors are not only consuming but are also actively engaged. What role does social media have in your business?
A: Social media plays a very large part in my business. I currently have more than 73,000 followers on Instagram and an additional 20,000 across other social media services. This provides me with a worldwide audience, ensuring instant feedback on all new pieces. If I don’t get at least 5,000 likes when I post on Instagram or Facebook, I will know that my painting is less likely to sell either as an original or as a print. Moreover, I am able to generate more sales for giclées or limited edition prints; social media is like a shop window with thousands of footfalls occurring on a daily basis.

Q: Do you think Millennial collectors are shopping online for art or do they want that in-person experience?
A: It is often the case that new collectors initially shop online but then want to meet with the artist in person. However, once they have had a chance to meet, it is not unusual for them to rely upon social media to keep them abreast of new works and ongoing exhibitions. That said, regular email updates to all my collectors is an essential part of the marketing process.

Q: Are young people spending enough money on art?
A:This is a difficult one to answer. How do you define “enough” money? I exhibit in cities as diverse as Miami and Tokyo, New York and Vienna. A large proportion of those attending the exhibitions appear to be in the age range of 20 to 30, irrespective of the geographical location. In the United Kingdom, Millennial couples are often referred to as Dinkys (Dual Income No Kids Yet). Many of these are indeed collectors. Either they have inherited wealth or generated riches from real estate, private equity or investment banking. Large proportions of these younger collectors are looking at art as an investment and tend to treat their collections as financial assets. Aesthetics seems to be for the more mature buyer.

Q: What tips or advice do you have for someone starting to collect art?
A: If you are collecting for investment purposes, limit your scope to known success stories only. Recognize that, as with all investments, values can go down as well as up and there are no guarantees. If you can’t afford the risk, then don’t make the gamble. If you collect because you love art, then go with your emotions and collect that which you love and want to live with. Any work of art that you truly love is worth a fortune. Think less about the capital outlay and more about the daily pleasure it will bring for years to come. I still recall one collector who had paid a handsome price for one of my earlier pieces, explaining that the daily rate he was paying, based on a lifetime of enjoying the piece, was less than the cost of a packet of candies.

Q: How do you think art collecting will change in the near future? What about the art market in general?
A: Economic downturns, money market upsets, political upheaval and global conflicts affect all aspects of modern life, and art collecting is no exception. The financial crash of 2008 – 2009 impacted collectors across the Western Hemisphere and particularly affected artists working in the mid-value range ($5,000 to $50,000). That said, the underlying trends remain. An ongoing hunger for new media and new formats, an ever-present desire for sensory shock and aesthetic challenge, an appreciation for those who challenge and those who promote, these are typical characteristics for every new generation. I have always been an advocate of Picasso, who said that art “is the lie that enables us to realize the truth” and that it “washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life.” While these are truisms, they are a truth that will never change. The baselines for art collectors will similarly remain the same. Be they connoisseurs or investors, aesthetic or name collectors, they will all continue to be as before. Where they look may change, how they review may vary, but collectors will continue to be driven by their own obsessions and the market will continue to thrive.