THE MARRIAGE OF ART AND INTERIOR DESIGN

BY DEBRA KRONOWITZ

SE FLORIDA STYLE & DESIGN sat down with top gallery owners and artists to get their thoughts and perspectives on how art factors into interior design and the approaches they use when working with interior designers so that they and their clients understand the value the right piece of art can bring to a space. Everyone agrees, there must be mutual respect, knowledge, communication and a willingness to listen to successfully weave together the art world and interior design. Everyone also agrees that art has an important role in interior design. After all, art sets or transforms the mood of a space. The job of the interior designer is to create a style that suits the client’s lifestyle and personality. Art’s role is to support the space. Choosing the right piece of art is critical. Korean-based interior designers Jae Woo and Ji Young explain it best: “If space is a person, art is the clothing they wear.”

Aldo Castillo Gallery

Q: What do you believe interior designers need to know in order to be successful when working with artists and/or art galleries?
A: Most often, art is the main inspiration for interior design work and ideas. Wise interior designers know it is best for their clients to be advised by an experienced art consultant—a reputable gallery. In addition, it is not a good idea to budget art into the interior design services. A wise designer brings their clients to the art venue and allows the client to connect with the artwork. Then, a separated art budget can be created.

Q: What do you look for in an interior designer you are considering working with?
A: One that knows his or her design and creative potential and acknowledges that art consultants are their counterpart.

Q: What are your suggestions for interior designers who want to work with artists or galleries?
A: To understand that art consultants are their best partners.

Q: What is your process for incorporating art into the design process when working with interior designers?
A: Contrasting their work. Art and interior design do not necessarily need to be all matchy-matchy.

Q: How do you go about promoting your art with interior designers?
A: In our 25 years of existence we have helped many designers. Most of our designer clients come to us as referrals. We never advertise to designers, because in the art industry a reputable gallery may be perceived “commercial.” Art is very personal.


Art Connection

Q: How does art factor in the interior design industry? How important is it?
A: It’s very important because art makes the finishing touches of the space.

Q: What do you believe interior designers need to know in order to be successful when working with artists and/or art galleries?
A: Interior designers need to have a thorough understanding of style, color and what their clients want and prefer.

Q: What do you look for in an interior designer you are considering working with?
A: Professionalism, experience and understanding.

Q: What are your suggestions for interior designers who want to work with artists or galleries?
A: If you know what you are looking for, good artists will be able to provide.

Q: What is your process for incorporating art into the design process when working with interior designers?
A: Style, color, artist and the client’s preferences.

Q: How do you go about promoting your art with interior designers?
A: We do a myriad of things, including shows, advertising and social media.


Art Scope Gallery
Q: How does art factor in the interior design industry? How important is it?
A: Art can tell a story or give life to a space. It can bring bold elements into the room or just be the perfect piece for a composition.

Q: What do you believe interior designers need to know in order to be successful when working with artists and/or art galleries?
A: There are three things, in my opinion. First, they need to be a great communicator. They should spend part
of their day communicating with other designers, architects, tradespeople, homeowners. Secondly, they need to be a mind reader. By that I mean pick up on the subtle cues of clients’ body language to truly give clients what they want. And lastly, continued education is important.

Q: What do you look for in an interior designer you are considering working with?
A: I look for interior designers who are professional and knowledgeable of their clients’ needs, as well as those who are open and have a willingness to give.
It’s not all about the money; it’s about customer satisfaction. Interior designers make interior space functional, safe and beautiful. By working with them, they
can help my clients with the appropriate artwork.

Q: What are your suggestions for interior designers who want to work with artists
or galleries?
A: Interior designers should work
directly with art galleries that are established and have years of
experience. With a large database of collectors, be mindful that our industry has many talented individuals who just need some support.

Q: What is your process for incorporating art into the design process when working with interior designers? A: I use my clients as a tool. Many of my clients are well-known collectors, and interiors designers merge with my clients’ inspiration, knowledge and so on.


Beau Wild Art
Q: How does art factor in the interior design industry? How important is it?
A: Art is but one component—still an important component—for a successful interior design. In residential or commercial projects, these spaces are sacred places for quiet and contemplation or excitement and adventure. Many designers and their clients feel that the strength of the art must elevate the overall design without overtaking the other components. So, you can see there is a fine line in creating a dynamic art piece without it being so strong as to be eliminated by the designer and client. My work should evolve into the perfect match of the artworks with the interior spaces.

Q: What do you believe interior designers need to know in order to be successful when working with artists and/or art galleries?
A: I never know exactly what an interior designer is looking for or how many pieces he or she may need to purchase. A willingness to work with the designer as a team is important. Offering a wide array of reasonably priced, large pieces, which are hard to find and often in the greatest demand, is important as is offering a grouping of smaller affordable pieces. I try to be flexible if the specific art needs tweaking, such as color changes, different framing, sizes. And I understand that my art may not be the perfect fit for the project.

Q: What do you look for in an interior designer you are considering working with?
A: I look for a willingness to work with me and my work, understanding this is a business for myself and for the interior designer. I believe that every client has his/her own unique story through his/her own life experiences, therefore I want to offer creative aesthetic paintings that fit their lifestyle. I research the interior designers and their style by viewing their websites. Do they focus on bold abstract paintings, monochromatic paintings or classic realism of landscapes? I want to make sure my art complements their designs. I pay attention to the colors and patterns that are trending in the design world. Designers often look for artwork that complements but does not match the interior design trends. Knowing this, I create art that works well with these current styles.

Q: What are your suggestions for interior designers who want to work with artists or galleries?
A: Working with an interior designer is a positive experience. As all designers know, every project is different. So, it’s important for the designer to understand the scope of the artist’s portfolio and how to best use these works within the design. I want them to know my process in creating art, which can be retold to the client. Many clients want to support local artists and know what the process is in creating their work; it’s fascinating for them.

Q: What is your process for incorporating art into the design process when working with interior designers?
A: I make time to get to know the designer. Samples of my work and understanding my process is helpful in developing good communications, which is key to making sure my art is included in the final design space. The designer and client may visit my studio to view works in progress, or I will take selected works to the job site.

Q: How do you go about promoting your art with interior designers?
A: I post weekly new works on my Instagram and Facebook pages. I use Constant Contact to keep my new work in view of designers. Once a designer has decided on my work for their project, I offer a price that the designer can then add an upcharge.


Deborah Bigeleisen Studios
Q: How does art factor in the interior design industry? How important is it?
A: Art is essential to setting the mood and the energy
in a room. It is the finishing touch—the jewel in the crown—whether it is paintings, three-dimensional wall art, sculpture or art glass. It should complement the décor, not necessarily “match” the décor, and it should bring added dimension and interest to the room.

Q: What do you believe interior designers need to know in order to be successful when working with artists and/or art galleries?
A: Finding the right art is probably the most difficult and time-consuming part of a designer’s project. I have found that many designers are uncomfortable with having to select art for their clients because it is personal. Each of us brings our own experiences to how we react to a work of art. It is particularly difficult when the client has no idea what they like. I believe that this is one factor that has contributed to the inexhaustible use of abstract art in interior design today. My job with the interior designer is to make their life easier by reducing their research time, assisting them in finding that right piece, regardless of my personal taste, my own art, what is trending or will it increase in value.
Trust in the artist or dealer is a big factor. Respected art dealers want to cultivate a relationship with the designer/client because they want repeat business. Price is also a factor, which often compromises the best art for a project, depending upon the amount of discount or professional courtesy the artist or gallery is willing to extend to the designer. Art is a negotiable item; it is not a commodity with a set price, where you have a choice of vendors at different price points. This really clouds and complicates the purchase. There is a subliminal energy that takes place between the client and the artist or the dealer. Clients love to make a personal connection with the artist, feel their energy, feel their passion, hear their story. It makes the purchase even more special. However, it is not always possible to meet the artist, so it falls to the dealer to be the conduit for the artist and the client to create that connection.
Ultimately, it becomes a collaborative effort between the parties. I call it a trifecta when the client, the designer and the source for the artwork all fall in love with the piece!

Q: What do you look for in an interior designer you are considering working with?
A: I look for their level of professionalism and how well organized they are. Next is their criteria for the project and their expectations. Then, I evaluate if our personalities fit and can we work together, as there has to be mutual respect.

Q: What are your suggestions for interior designers who want to work with artists or galleries?
A: Many designers have existing relationships with a dealer or artist, which makes their job much easier; it’s a one-stop shop, it is comfortable, there is a good level of trust, and they use that resource for many of their projects.
Because of how rapidly the art market changes, designers may be narrowing their scope as to what else is out there. It is always good
to get another perspective, build additional relationships. Art is a very personal purchase, and one should be open-minded to other resources and genres. You never know where you will find that next jewel in the crown, if you keep going to the same dealers.
Avoid an artist or dealer who is just looking to make a sale without any sense of the project at hand. The value of art is becoming more questionable at every price level, so be wary about being sold on
the perception that the work will increase in value. Is the art being purchased for investment or for decoration.

Q: What is your process for incorporating art into the design process when working with interior designers?
A: Every project is different, but whether it is for a single painting for a private client or multiple images for a corporate project, I always look to capture the aesthetic sense of what the designer is looking for. It does not necessarily have to be with my work. I follow the art and design markets with multiple blogs, trade blogs, trade magazines and the international fine art fairs to stay current with what is trending throughout the markets so that I can provide a comprehensive, informed creative service to the designer.

Q: How do you go about promoting your art with interior designers?
A: I am always looking for new avenues to effectively reach prospective clients. I network. I am social and like talking to people, whether at a gallery reception, a charity event, an art fair, on a plane—you never know whom you’ll meet and where. I continually expand my database of designers and architecture and design firms, which I market to through direct email and marketing campaigns. Instagram is great tool for getting your work noticed. I have a strong presence on 1stDibs through two of my galleries; one of them also markets through Artnet and Artsy. I also have a presence on Saatchi Art and Houzz. And, of course, taking a presence in this issue of SE Florida Style & Design.


DelrayART
Q: How does art factor in the interior design industry? How important is it?
A: Art remains a major factor in interior design. That said, there is a growing competition from new wall materials and treatments, such as sculpted panels and LED lighting and garden walls that compete with traditional art. All of these exert pricing pressures that did not really exist before.

Q: What do you believe interior designers need to know in order to be successful when working with artists and/or art galleries?
A: I am not sure there is any one thing. As an artist with my own gallery, I welcome interior designers and enjoy those opportunities when we have some input into how several rooms might be approached.

Q: What do you look for in an interior designer you are considering working with? A: I value directness and honesty.
Q: What are your suggestions for interior designers who want to work with artists or galleries?
A: Show them you are really enthusiastic about presenting their work to clients when appropriate. I like to tell them I “deputize” them to go out and find me buyers, and I reward with a 20 percent commission on sales, even if unrelated to a particular job they are working on.

Q: What is your process for incorporating art into the design process when working with interior designers?
A: I am currently working on a very
large boutique hotel project that has me interacting closely with both the interior designer and owners. While I am open to input, I established early on that, in the end, it is my art, and I get a final decision on whether I do something, or not. It’s best to be clear about this up front to avoid conflict later.

Q: How do you go about promoting your art with interior designers?
A: I get most of my projects through advertising in art and design magazines interior designers look at. This is still the best way to get my work in front of interior designers.


Gappa Glass
Q: How does art factor in the interior design industry? How important is it?
A: I believe that the proper design of
space is art, and therefore, both the art
and the surrounding space should work
in tandem from the very beginning. Fine art can either elegantly complement the surrounding space or powerfully contrast the area. Artwork can serve as a focal point, or rather a field within the space allowing the viewers to intimately interact with the work.

Q: What do you believe interior designers need to know in order to be successful when working with artists and/or art galleries?
A: Interior designers should engage the artist or gallery early in the design process. Learn the limitations and advantages
for each medium, especially if the client wishes to have customized artwork specifically designed for their space.

Q: What do you look for in an interior designer you are considering working with?
A: Ideally, someone who is excited about creating a one-of-a-kind glass installation or chandelier that complements the client’s space. I look for an interior designer who is passionate about the overall experience of their space, as well as the finite detail sensibilities needed to draw the client in.

Q: What are your suggestions for interior designers who want to work with artists or galleries?
A: It is important to understand realistic timelines to create the work. If a client is wanting to have a large-scale installation created, then weight factors, ADA compliancy, structural mounting details and proper illumination need to be addressed early on in the design process.

Q: What is your process for incorporating art into the design process when working with interior designers?
A: As a glass artist and former architect,
I am inspired by both the surrounding environment as well as the conceptual catalyst derived from the client. I like
to get to know my clients and seek out imagery, colors or sculptural designs that connect with those who are experiencing my art. At the same time, I conceptually work within and around the special parameters the designer has created.

Q: How do you go about promoting your art with interior designers?
A: I stay engaged with the interior design community through public events, continuing education programs and trade shows. But more importantly, I continually invite designers to my glassblowing studio and gallery to be a part of what glass artwork has to offer their client’s space. I am incredibly passionate about educating designers about how incredible handblown art glass is, and how glass can successfully be a part of who we are and where we live.


Heart of Delray Gallery
Q: How does art factor in the interior design industry? How important is it?
A: Art is a huge factor in interior design. In my opinion, the right piece of art can make or break the room. Color plays a major factor in interior design spaces. The art is, or can be, what ties everything together.

Q: What do you believe interior designers need to know in order to be successful when working with artists and/or art galleries?
A: Interior designers should know a
little about what style of art the gallery
is known for, so they know where to go for their client. But, more importantly,
the interior designer should know what style of art their client likes and how to tie that into the design of the house or the individual rooms. It shouldn’t just be about color, it should be what helps to represent the client in their own home. It helps for a designer to have a relationship with specific galleries to have a partner in helping to find that art.

Q: What do you look for in an interior designer you are considering working with?
A: In working with an interior designer, I look for someone who is open-minded and willing to take suggestions. Finding the right art for somebody is very important, as is making sure the client is happy.
The interior designer can give the art consultant the information needed to make the best suggestions.

Q: How do you go about promoting your art with interior designers?
A: We market our artwork to everyone, including interior designers. The internet is very useful in doing this.


Jennifer Lashbrook
Q: How does art factor in the interior design industry? How important is it?
A: I believe art is the anchor in a well-planned design. But art does not have to match the couch! A neutral design palette allows for a huge pop of color with the artwork.

Q: What do you believe interior designers need to know in order to be successful when working with artists and/or art galleries?
A: Fine art takes time. My commission
list is booked out for a year. Most clients, whether private or designer, want the work to be immediate.

Q: What do you look for in an interior designer you are considering working with?
A: I review past project designs and where they are located.

Q: What are your suggestions for interior designers who want to work with artists or galleries?
A: Just reach out to the artist. I am honored that my art hangs in so many public spaces and look forward to more opportunities.

Q: What is your process for incorporating art into the design process when working with interior designers?
A: I am open to different subject matters because my style is cohesive no matter what the image. I realize that this doesn’t work for all art forms, but my style allows for different subject matters.

Q: How do you go about promoting your art with interior designers?
A: I am fortunate that most designers find my work organically through festivals, galleries, TV or movies.


Joel Shapses Art
Q: How does art factor in the interior design industry? How important is it?
A: Art is usually an afterthought, rather than an inspiration. It is more often that a designer’s clients (except for the one percent high-end art collectors) have few dollars allocated to art by the designer when a project budget is created.

Q: What do you believe interior designers need to know in order to be successful when working with artists and/or art galleries?
A: Designers need to create, with their client, a working budget that has at least 10 percent allocated toward art.

Q: What do you look for in an interior designer you are considering working with?
A: Clear communication and engaging their client with me personally to help fulfill their needs, if we are discussing a commissioned piece of artwork.

Q: What are your suggestions for interior designers who want to work with artists or galleries?
A: Know the artist. Call upon them directly.

Q: What is your process for incorporating art into the design process when working with interior designers?
A: Viewing the project (floor plans are essential) and sight lines to determine size and scope of the artwork needed.

Q: How do you go about promoting your art with interior designers?
A: It is through word of mouth.


Kevin McPherrin Gallery
Q: How does art factor in the interior design industry? How important is it?
A: Artwork is the crowning glory of every residential design job. Nothing says more about the taste and sophistication of both the interior designer and the homeowner. Look at site photography selected by high-end trade publications—they all have captivating art or sculpture.

Q: What do you believe interior designers need to know in order to be successful when working with artists and/or art galleries?
A: Designers who want to be considered exclusive need to know the difference between a giclée and an original painting. A giclée is a machine-made print on canvas and can be reproduced hundreds of times. An original painting is done by hand in the manner of artists since the Renaissance and are, by definition, unique. Affluent clients want exclusivity and authenticity.

Q: What do you look for in an interior designer you are considering working with?
A: I like to see a designer who listens to their client in art selection. There is no acquisition that is more personal and emotional than an art purchase. Therefore, beside the design merit of color, scale and subject matter, strong consideration should be given to the client’s feelings about the piece under consideration.

Q: What are your suggestions for interior designers who want to work with artists or galleries?
A: I would suggest that the designer come to the gallery first, without the client, to
“pre-select.” They should bring their art size specifications and swatches of dominant color elements in the room. The pre-selection visit helps simplify the follow-up visit with the client by eliminating many pieces that will not work due to size and color scheme.

Q: What is your process for incorporating art into the design process when working with interior designers?
A: I always encourage designers to start the gallery visits months before art selections must be made. Often, this allows the client to discover what really moves them, which isn’t always what they think. For example, some clients claim they only love abstracts, but find that a certain artist’s figurative work speaks to them. The early art exposure can help the homeowner and designer find a direction or theme for the project and thereby speed the selection of fabrics, furniture and accessories.

Q: How do you go about promoting your art with interior designers?
A: Ninety percent of our sales are to repeat customers, all high-end designers and art galleries. The best way to promote is to ensure that every job is handled flawlessly, from selection to installation.


Meredith Poston
Q: How does art factor in the interior design industry? How important is it?
A: Interior design is an art form itself. One that uses other forms of fine art to enhance the décor and mood, deeming it highly important.

Q: What do you believe interior designers need to know in order to be successful when working with artists and/or art galleries?
A: Designers should be understanding of myriad opinions and options in the art world. There are pieces that many people would love to display in their homes. At the same time, there are those who are interested in totally different types of art. It isn’t an insult if one artist is preferred over another; it is simply different styles for different people.

Q: What do you look for in an interior designer you are considering working with?
A: I am interested in working with designers who are supportive of my work and interested in displaying it for their customers. In addition,
I look for designers who have the type of customers who would also be quite interested in having my artwork hanging on their walls.

Q: What are your suggestions for interior designers who want to work with artists or galleries?
A: I recommend having a few options; work with a handful of artists/galleries so that you have access to multiple style choices. Different clients will be interested in different types of fine art and décor.

Q: What is your process for incorporating art into the design process when working with interior designers?
A: Whatever feels best with the ambience created by the designer—making decisions on what will be most complementary and suitable in the space that is being worked on.

Q: How do you go about promoting your art with interior designers?
A: I promote through my website, social media accounts and the Style & Design publications
[Southeast Florida, Dallas and Charleston]. Much of my promotion is done through networking and building relationships with designers so that we can continue working together in the future.


Miracle Art Life/
Souren Mousavi Fine Art

Q: How does art factor in the interior design industry?
How important is it?
A: The interior design industry spans such a broad spectrum of deliverables that defining how art features in the process is open-ended. From commercial/utilitarian environments, through residential and domestic to public sector, each has its own needs. The common thread is humanity, and for millennia humanity and the arts have been inextricably linked. If the construct of an interior defines how it will be used, the design and its artistic elements will define how it feels and why it will be remembered. Art is critical in fulfilling an individual’s expectations.

Q: What do you believe interior designers need to know in order to be successful when working with artists and/or art galleries?
A: The primary responsibility of the interior designer is to define and then meet the expectations of the client. This is always a two-stage process and heavily dependent on the skill of the designer, not to mention the budget of the client. A good designer will already have a select group of artists who they know will have, or can deliver, works of an appropriate scale, construct, quality and ambience that complement the designer’s brief. The designer must go forearmed with this knowledge and, in some instances, involve the artist from the onset. In all design projects time is money, and a successful designer will not want to spend time in research and development. They need artists who can deliver solutions and for that they need to know the artists well.

Q: What do you look for in an interior designer you are considering working with?
A: Ideally, a proven track record with references to support their experience. With or without that it will still come down to their communication skills, their willingness to listen to my ideas and suggestions, and an empathetic personality.
A lot of artists struggle with collaborative processes. They can see them as inhibiting their own creativity and, when this happens, conflicts can arise. We don’t have to be like-minded, but we both must be open-minded.

Q: What are your suggestions for interior designers who want to work with artists or galleries?
A: I once read that marriages aren’t made in heaven; each partner must share the responsibility for building a successful future. I think this is true for all collaborative endeavours. Respect each other’s skills, accept each other’s weaknesses, capitalize on each other’s strengths and, most important
of all, act with honesty and integrity. Establish the ground rules, but accept they may have to change. Try to balance the commercial demands of your business with the creative demands of your artist.

Q: What is your process for incorporating art into the design process when working with interior designers?
A: Wherever possible I like to know the client. This can be through personal meetings, web-based discussions or third-party research. It goes without saying that I would expect to already know and trust the designer.
The art piece or pieces themselves would go through the same creative processes that I use for all my work. However, the designer, and possibly the client, would be consulted at each of the iterative stages of creation—concept, themes, content, sketches, drawings, outlines, sizing, coloring, etc.
However, once trust has been established, I would expect the level of involvement to decline to a minimum, with only one or two consultations from concept to delivery.

Q: How do you go about promoting your art with interior designers?
A: This is always a challenging area for aspiring artists. I have used intermediaries who I know have access to trade publications and who already work with top designers around the world; but in truth, there is no single answer. Social media has played a large part in the promotion of my brand, and
I have used national and international exhibitions as a shop window for galleries, collectors and designers. Moreover, no one should underestimate the importance of having the support of magazines. To be seen leads to being known. To be known leads to being recognised—hopefully for all the right reasons. Recognition can and will lead to demand.


Rhona LK Schonwald
Q: How does art factor in the interior design industry? How important is it?
A: Art is as important, if not more so,
as anything else in a home. Art is what
“speaks” to the personality of the individual(s) who live in the space. It reflects their loves, their hobbies, their passions. Sofas have to be comfortable and lighting has to be appropriate to the task; art—paintings, sculptures or prints— if placed well and of the right proportions, are the heart and soul of every space. And, art absolutely does not have to match the sofa or any other furnishings.

Q: What do you believe interior designers need to know in order to be successful when working with artists and/or art galleries?
A: Interior designers, like most of us, tend to stay in their comfort zone. Furniture, lighting, paint colors may all be within their area of expertise, but not necessarily so with art. Artists love to work with interior designers, and because of that, may give discounts to interior designers, which may be passed on to their clients or not, depending on the arrangements between them and their clients. Many artists are interested in doing private commission pieces and/or have a substantial body of work from which to choose. Signed,
numbered limited edition prints are a good starting point for both the designer and the client, if the client has not purchased art before. I offer such prints for those who do not yet consider themselves collectors.

Q: What do you look for in an interior designer you are considering working with?
A: As with any relationship, mutual respect is key. To build an ongoing relationship, compatibility of design aesthetics and personalities that “click” are most helpful.

Q: What are your suggestions for interior designers who want to work with artists or galleries?
A: Jump in! We are not snobs, and we don’t bite. We love what we do and
know that it takes a special person to be courageous enough to buy something unique. It is easy to do what is acceptable and recognized. If clients are open to having a special space designed by a special person (the designer), continue the journey with something that will be cherished for decades to come.

Q: What is your process for incorporating art into the design process when working with interior designers?
A: Assuming I have been consulted in the beginning of the project, once I hear the overall concept, I may suggest paintings, photographs or prints that I think would work on a given wall or space. I usually suggest multiples for each so that both the designer and client have options and feel validated. Ultimately, I am here to serve their needs.
Frequently, people are afraid of a piece being too big for a space. It becomes
a case of “is the glass half empty or is
the glass half full?” Rather than a piece overpowering a space, which of course
is one way to look at it, the piece can become a dramatic focal point, which
is the more positive attitude. This what happened recently with two individuals. When I suggested that they measure their walls rather than going with what felt
“safe,” they took my suggestion and were absolutely thrilled.

Q: How do you go about promoting your art with interior designers?
A: I love looking at shelter magazines, and when I feel intrigued by the design aesthetic of the architect or interior designer, I contact them in the hopes of working with them. I also follow them on Instagram. Sometimes I send out postcards with images of my work. I am always open to new possibilities.


Sheetal Shaw
Q: How does art factor in the interior design industry? How important is it?
A: Art (sculptures, paintings, decorative objects, photographs and prints) is integral in creating and enhancing a live/workspace and factors in the interior design industry as a visual element that not only adds beauty but initiates a dialogue, creates a theme and produces a mood in a dwelling.

Q: What do you believe interior designers need to know in order to be successful when working with artists and/or art galleries?
A: Any type of interpersonal relationship begins with positive chemistry and a good vibe between people, be it between an interior designer
and artist and/or art gallery. Know that not
all artists are created equal, and that they are complex individuals. Each artist has a different temperament, work ethic, talent and level of flexibility. Find an artist, or gallery, who is willing to override and blend most, if not all, of those differential character traits with yours for a successful collaboration and completion of your interior design project.

Q: What do you look for in an interior designer you are considering working with?
A: I would love to work with an interior designer who is down-to-earth, professional and friendly—one who values my time as much as they value theirs. Also, I look for designers who genuinely want to work with me and who are straightforward about the entire process of collaborating with them on a design project from concept to completion.

Q: What are your suggestions for interior designers who want to work with artists or galleries?
A: Be clear and honest in all your communications and, if the need arises, give constructive criticism to encourage the artist so he/she enhances the quality of the work they create. Provide a step-by-step project schedule with a probable turnaround time. Connect the artist and/or gallery to other trustworthy industry professionals they may need to collaborate with within the scope of the project in order to complete their share of the work.


Sweet Art Gallery
Q: How does art factor in the interior design industry? How important is it?
A: In today’s commercial and residential design, art factors in in many ways. Most importantly, it should be the focal point and define the purpose of the room. Like a signature, it can be a bold statement piece or a serene painting that sets the tone for the space.

Q: What do you believe interior designers need to know in order to be successful when working with artists and/or art galleries?
A: To be able to use original art is freedom. Many clients have been collecting artwork for years, and it needs
to be incorporated into the new design plan whenever possible. It is always a pleasure to work with designers who have the knack to transition during the new design process, adding just the right new art to complement the existing collection. For that very reason, it is very important that designers and their clients discuss an art budget early in the design phase.

Q: What do you look for in an interior designer you are considering working with?
A: We have our best designer relationships when they are familiar with fine art. Our gallery only deals in one-of-a-kind original artwork and commission pieces.

Q: What do you look for in an interior designer you are considering working with?
A: Galleries are a wealth of information to interior designers. We have the knowledge about each artist and do most of the work. Our most successful designers keep us abreast about their projects so we may have
a plan for when it is time to incorporate art. It always works best if you have reputable gallery relationships.

Q: What are your suggestions for interior designers who want to work with artists or galleries?
A: To listen.

Q: What is your process for incorporating art into the design process when working with interior designers? A: We offer complimentary consultations and usually take the proposed artwork to the project to make sure it is perfect for the space intended. We also coordinate custom framing, if necessary, and offer delivery
and installation.

Q: How do you go about promoting your art with interior designers?
A: We try very hard to get maximum exposure through design magazines, social media and our website, which showcases our entire inventory of more than 45 gallery artists.


Talin Tropic Studio
Q: How does art factor in the interior design industry?
A: Art in interior design is powerful, paramount and primary.
Art is a starting point for designing an interior space. Art is personal and creates the colors and finishes specified.

Q: What do you believe interior designers need to know in order to be successful when working with artists and/or art galleries?
A: Interior designers are embracing consumers’ desire to fill their homes with art. They need to find artists and artisans who are adept or have experience working with interior designers. Most beginning artists may be willing to adjust pricing for the client; however, they may not have the experience and/or ability to interpret the client’s vision.
It is important to find an artist or gallery who wants and has the ability to create the look, style, ambience, emotion and vision the designer and client want, not what they want to impose on the client. The artist’s taste and desires are not of primary significance, the client’s are.

Q: What do you look for in an interior designer you are considering working with?
A: Find a designer whose work is in sync with your own. After that, the level of experience, reputation and professionalism comes into play.

Q: What are your suggestions for interior designers who want to work with artists or galleries?
A: Look for experience and reputation.

Q: What is your process for incorporating art into the design process when working with an interior designer?
A: Meeting not only with the designer but the client is foremost. This tells me what they desire and how to prepare my preliminary paintings. I obtain all the colorways, swatches, style charts and space design storyboards. Then I take into consideration the client’s lifestyle, personality and sometimes “little unique quirks” to make their artwork special and fun for them. Upon approval of preliminary paintings, I proceed to create the original work of art.

Q: How do you go about promoting your art with interior designers?
A: I advertise in this publication. In addition, personal business relationships are important. I like to send brochures and information packets with new works, current collections and additional information, then calling and making appointments to visit the designer in person. Gaining insight into what their needs are and what kind of projects they are working on, allows me to help them and provide congruent artwork for them.